The Value of Internships for College Students

Education can be the golden ticket to a path of prosperity. Not only does a university education enrich your mind, but it can also increase your market value and long-term career prospects.  However, in a tighter job market, employers are often seeking more than a college degree along from recent graduates. How should students seek to distinguish themselves during their four years in college beyond achieving stellar grades and majoring in a field that has a high demand?  Internships have become a key way to differentiate recent college graduates applying for their first professional positions. Employers want to see a modicum of experience and self-initiative from recent graduates. Follow these recommendations from campus recruiters to maximize your four years in college and become a more competitive candidate for jobs upon graduation.

The first year in college is generally a time of exploration, learning to navigate the campus and college process. Time management skills are generally honed during the first year of college. While most companies will not recruit freshmen for internships, opportunities still exist for freshmen to begin developing a professional network and building a resume. Give serious consideration to the enormous options for activities on campus. Most academic majors offer professional organizations that explore career options and offer hands-on career experience.  Joining various clubs and organizations that truly interest you and can add value to your resume and future career aspirations are absolutely recommended and well worth your time and effort.

As you begin networking for internship positions, keep track of your efforts and begin building your network by either maintaining a digital log or written. Take advantage of the awesome deals offered by Groupon coupons and select from the office supplies and electronics available at Target. During your freshman year, connect with the professionals at the university career development office. They will have access to companies that recruit from your campus and a very clear picture of the profile of the students that succeed in the recruiting process. Ask for assistance or inquire about available workshops to help prepare an effective resume. Keep the professors in your academic area of study informed of your efforts and let them know your interest in landing a quality internship. Networking is just as valuable as gaining exposure and experience in campus clubs and organizations.  Not only will internships in your field of study make you a more attractive candidate to employers, internships also serve as a confirmation that the area of study you’ve chosen can translate into a career that would genuine interest you. Best of luck in building a strong resume of quality internships over the next four years and presenting yourself as a strong candidate to company’s recruiting graduates from your university.…

Online Degrees Vs Traditional Degrees

Sloan Consortium, a group of organizations dedicated to quality online education, said in the seventh edition of its annual report on the state of online learning in the U.S. that online enrollments, which have been growing at a faster rate than the total higher education student population, are showing no signs of slowing.

The report stated that over 4.6 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall term of 2008 – an increase of 17 percent over the previous year and far exceeding the 1.2 percent growth in the overall higher education student population.

It is clear that online education is emerging as a popular choice for the new-age student. However, a debate is still raging over which is better – online degree programs or on-campus degrees. While there is no easy answer to this because which of the two alternatives work better for you depends to a large degree on your circumstances, let’s compare the two modes of education on some important parameters to get a clearer picture.

Accessibility

Online: One of the greatest breakthroughs of online education has been that it has made higher education accessible to many people, who are unable to attend a bricks and mortar school for a variety of reasons. Moreover, online students are not bound by any geographical limits. They can apply to any school of their choice as they are free to pursue an online program from anywhere.

Campus: Campus-based education still works within a fairly rigid structure. From location to lodging, everything needs to fall in place if you are considering traditional, classroom-based degree programs.

Validity

Online: “Diploma mills” are the biggest bane of online education. Diploma mills are fraudulent institutions that sell unaccredited degrees, which involve no serious academic study. It is, therefore, imperative that students check the credentials of a university offering online programs. Accredited online degrees are accepted as valid degrees by academicians as well as employers. There is no greater indicator of its validity than the availability of federal student aid to those enrolled in an eligible online degree program at an accredited Title IV-eligible institution.

Campus: Although there may be some fraudulent bricks and mortar schools, the prevalence of such schools is comparatively less than substandard or unaccredited online schools. However, even if you are attending campus-based programs, it’s good to have your tracks covered by checking the reputation and accreditation status of the school.

Acceptance

Online: Various research organizations have statistics to prove the growing acceptability of online degrees. Academic leaders as well as employers now acknowledge the legitimacy of online programs and most treat them at par with traditional degrees.

Campus: According to some experts, certain programs are less suited for online only schools. Campus-based learning is generally advisable for disciplines like engineering. Programs that require extensive practical and hands on training or involve great deal of laboratory work are better pursed at a bricks and mortar institute.

Quality

Online: This again ties back to the question of validity and …

Kristen Stewart (Twilight New Moon: Bella Swan) Biography

Born April 9, 1990 – is an American actress. She is best known for playing Bella Swan in Twilight, New Moon, and will reprise her role in Twilight Eclipse. She has also starred in films such as Panic Room, Zathura, In the Land of Women, Adventureland, and The Messengers.

Early life:

Stewart was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. Her father, John Stewart, is a stage manager and television producer who has worked for Fox.Her mother, Jules Mann-Stewart, is a script supervisor originally from Maroochydore, Queensland, Australia. She has an older brother, Cameron Stewart. Stewart attended school until the seventh grade, and then continued her education by correspondence. She has since completed high school.

Personal life:

Stewart currently lives in Woodland Hills in Los Angeles, California. In a 2008 interview with Vanity Fair, Stewart stated that she was dating actor Michael Angarano, her co-star from the movie Speak. Stewart has expressed a desire to live and work in Australia, saying, “I want to go to Sydney University in Australia. My mom’s from there.” Apart from acting, she is also interested in attending college in the near future, saying, “I want to go to college for literature. I want to be a writer. I mean, I love what I do, but it’s not all I want to do — be a professional liar for the rest of my life.” Stewart is a guitar player and singer.

If you wish you can Watch Twilight New Moon Online or Download Twilight New Moon Movie and watch it on your PC or DVD 😉…

Benefits of Music Education

Three Powerful Reasons why children benefit from music education as part of their Curriculum, especially at a young age. There has been plenty of research done about the benefits of music education for young children.

1. Playing music improves concentration, memory and self-expression

One two-year study in Switzerland run with 1200 children in more than 50 classes scientifically showed how playing music improved children’s reading and verbal skills through improving concentration, memory and self-expression.(1) Younger children who had three more music classes per week and three fewer main curriculums made rapid developments in speech and learned to read with greater ease.

Other effects revealed by the study showed that children learned to like each other more, enjoyed school more (as did their teachers) and were less stressed during the various tests, indicating they were better able to handle performance pressure.

2. Playing music improves the ability to think

Ongoing research at the University of California-Irvine and the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh (2) demonstrate that learning and playing music builds or modifies Neural pathways related to spatial reasoning tasks, which are crucial for higher brain functions like complex maths, chess and science.

The first studies showed that listening to a Mozart sonata temporarily improved a child’s spatial abilities. Further studies compared children who had computer lessons, children who had singing lessons, children who learned music using a Keyboard and children who did nothing additional. The children who had had the Music classes scored significantly higher – up to 35% higher – than the children did Who had computer classes or did nothing additional.(3)

3. Learning music helps under-performing students to improve

Researchers at Brown University in the US (4) discovered that children aged 5-7 years who had been lagging behind in their school performance had caught up with their peers in reading and were ahead of them in math’s after seven months of music lessons. The children’s classroom attitudes and behavior ratings had also Significantly improved, and after a year of music classes were rated as better than the children who had had no additional classes.

1. E W Weber, M Spychiger and J-L Patry, Musik macht Schule. Biografie und Ergebnisse eines Schulversuchs mit erweitertemMusikuntericcht. Padagogik in der Blauen Eule, Bd17. 1993.

2. Various studies by Dr. Gordon Shaw (University of California-Irvine) and Dr. Fran Rauscher (University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh), with others.Including those published in Nature 365:611 and Neuroscience Letters 185:44-47

3. E L Wright, W R Dennis & R L Newcomb. Neurological Res.19:2-8. 1997

4. M F Gardiner, A Fox, F Knowles & D Jeffrey. Learning improved by arts training. Nature 381:284. 1996.…

THE ART INSTITUTES OFFERS EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE

Jacquelyn P. Muller, AVP – Public Relations, (412) 995-7262
Devra Pransky, PR Specialist, (412) 995-7685

(PITTSBURGH – September 12, 2005) The Art Institutes announced
today that it will assist both domestic and international
students from universities in New Orleans, southern Louisiana,
Mississippi and Alabama universities, which have been closed for
the foreseeable future due to the devastation caused by
Hurricane Katrina.

The Art Institutes will make available both on-campus and
online courses that might be able to permit dislocated students
to progress in their academic careers during this semester of
disruption. Students at a university forced to close by
Hurricane Katrina may register at any of The Art Institutes 31
locations across the nation for courses, on a space-available
basis, for the fall semester.

The Art Institutes will waive tuition for dislocated students
who have already registered and paid tuition at their home
institution for the fall 2005 semester. If dislocated students
have not yet paid their tuition at their home institution, they
will be assessed the lesser of the current published tuition and
fees at the home institution, or The Art Institutes’ published
tuition and fees for the fall semester, as determined by the
school president.

“The Art Institutes strives to assist college students who have
been affected by Hurricane Katrina,” says Dave Pauldine,
president of The Art Institutes. “The Art Institutes offers this
initiative as a way to reach out to the students in the Gulf
Coast region whose lives and education have been impacted by
Hurricane Katrina and do what we can to assist those students.”

The Art Institutes is a group of 31educational institutions
located throughout North America. Offering a broad range of
programs including: audio production, culinary arts, culinary
management, fashion design, fashion marketing, graphic design,
industrial design technology, interior design, media arts &
animation, multimedia & Web design, photography, restaurant
management and video production. Not all programs are offered at
all schools.

The Art Institutes operate in Atlanta, Arlington, VA (as The
Art Institute of Washington), Boston (as The New England
Institute of Art), Charlotte, Chicago and Schaumburg, IL,
Cincinnati (as The Art Institute of Ohio – Cincinnati), Dallas,
Denver, Fort Lauderdale, Houston, Las Vegas, Los Angeles (as The
Art Institute of California – Los Angeles and California Design
College), Miami (as Miami International University of Art &
Design), Minneapolis, New York, Orange County, CA, Philadelphia,
Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Portland, San Diego, San Francisco,
Seattle, Tampa, Toronto , Vancouver (as The Art Institute of
Vancouver, York, PA (as Bradley Academy of the Visual Arts) and
The Art Institute Online, a division of The Art Institute of
Pittsburgh.

Students seeking additional information about The Art
Institutes’ initiative can view the policy in its entirety at
(www.artinstitutes.edu/katrina) or call the National Admissions
Information Center at 1-888-328-7900.

The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu), with 31 education
institutions located throughout North America, provide an
important source of design, media arts, fashion and culinary
professionals. The parent company of The Art Institutes,
Education Management Corporation (www.edmc.com) is among the
largest providers of